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Our best bets for day two of the Galway Festival are now live. Visit our Galway Tips page for the best quartet of selections according to our top tipsters.

Plus, get the thoughts of Grade 1 winning jockey Danny Mullins in his Tote blog.

While crowds will be restricted to just 1000 people a day, the Galway Festival is set to be one of the highlights of the Irish racing calendar.

Mixing competitive jumping and a plethora of good flat races, the seven days in Ballybrit promise to deliver a feast for racing fans.

Throughout the week in the south-west of Ireland Tote will be providing tips and insights for the event which kicks off on Monday 26th July.

There are still a few weeks to wait for the full declarations, and we’re yet to see who will line up across the 53 races, but there is still an opportunity to prepare for the Galway Summer Festival.

Big races at Galway Festival

Spread over seven glorious afternoons and evenings, the Galway Festival provides entertainment for flat and jumps fans alike.

The first two and last two days of the meeting are dedicated to the National Hunt side of things while three days of action on the level provides the meat in the sandwich.

Betting opportunities are certain to be spread across the week, but there are three races that stand out in terms of appeal.

Galway Hurdle

Won last year by Aramon to give Willie Mullins a record fourth win in the race, the 2m event has seen a number of Graded and even Grade 1 performers grace the race in the past.

Last year’s winner had scored at the top level as a novice, while 2018 winner Sharjah subsequently won four Grade 1s over hurdles.

Aramon Galway Festival

The race has been good value for Tote punters recently too, with the last four victors paying more in the pools than at SP.

Of this year’s event, it could be that Skyace continues to prove she’s great value for connections having cost just £600. Since arriving at Shark Hanlon’s yard she has earned just shy of £100,000 in prize money, her most recent win coming at Grade 1 level.

She could have some interesting competition with Denise Foster’s Call Me Lyreen and Henry De Bromhead’s Annexation pencilled in for the race, the latter an impressive winner at Kilbeggan last month.

Galway Plate

While Willie Mullins can boast four Galway Hurdles, he’s not won the Plate since 2011, and instead it’s Dermot Weld with the quartet of victories to his name.

In recent years it’s been a race to follow the colours of the major owners with JP McManus, Gigginstown, Simon Munir and Isaac Souede, and Rich Ricci owning 10 of the last 11 winners.

One horse who could carry the burgundy of Gigginstown to success this time round is Samcro who has been mooted for this often hotly competitive chase. He’ll need to improve on his Listowel run in June, but this Cheltenham Festival winner still has plenty of class.

He has much more to prove than another owned by a jumping powerhouse in the form of The Shunter for JP McManus. Emmet Mullins' dual-purpose star is 12lbs higher in the weights than when an impressive winner of the Plate at Cheltenham, but continued his inspired progression to finish second in the Grade 1 Manifesto Novices' Chase at Aintree. He looks sure to be on the premises.

Corrib Fillies Stakes

The opportunity to bag some black type presents itself here in this Listed event, the best quality race on the flat at the Galway Festival.

The race was the last run outside of Group company for Johnny Murtagh’s Champers Elysees as she went on to win the Matron Stakes after taking this event in 2020.

The three-year-olds have won four of the last six renewals of this race, so it’s always worth casting an eye over any of the classic generation that take their chance.

Best bets for the Galway Festival

With no entries, declarations, or much idea about which horses will run at the Galway Festival, it’s hard to pin-point the value in Ballybrit.

Keep checking Tote.co.uk closer to the time for insights and top tips towards the seven days of racing, from dark horses to Placepot pointers.


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